Thursday, March 20, 2014

I have moved! ----> www.meditationswerve.com

Hello everyone!

I have moved!

Please visit my new home at www.meditationswerve.com

My message has been evolving and my self work continues daily

thank you for joining me

hope all is flowing, hope all is moving

continue to face stagnation

continue moving on forward my friends


Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Some writing from me on a different website!

You can find some of my writing here from a local Vancouver wellness group:

http://www.lulora.com/author/larry-li/

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Friday, July 26, 2013

Meditation and the environment

Meditation and environment

Written at midnight in old town Heidelberg, Germany.




I remember a certain episode of mein life, I was twenty one years old living by myself on Vancouver Island. I had been staying in an old but quaint apartment for a few months now, playing guitar, video games, and not going to class. My anxiety had risen to my neck and there was no school going or studying for me. I spent most of my time attempting to drown out my mind with fried foods and virtual realities. I also received a note in my mailbox from my neighbors once. It simply said: noisy fucker. I guess I was inconsiderate of both my inner world and my outer world.

As the turmoil in my mental landscape increased, the world out there followed suit. I began to spend more and more of my time creating and fighting silly battles that seemed absolutely crucial at the time.

The battle for this episode was the clicking and whirring sounds made by my slightly aged fridge. Management did not care for my silly complaints and my attempts to not let the noise bother me were utter failures. Day by day the whirring gizmatic sounds of my food preserver seemed to increase in volume. I was at the point now where the noise would keep me up at night.

The noise came in cycles. Approximately twenty minutes of click clack whirrs followed by five minutes of rest.  The five minutes of quiet were zones of "peace" where I would desperately attempt to fall asleep. On this particular night I was failing over and over again. My mind would not give rest to my aching field of awareness.

I snapped. I sprung out of bed with the fury of a blood-lusted orc. If I was salivating like a savage I would not be surprised. I bulldozed towards the fridge and shook it like a madman. I didn't realize the enemy was myself at the time so the fridge had to be the problem. If I could satisfy this condition then peace would be mine. I shook and rumbled the fridge more; the sounds stopped for a moment only to come back seemingly stronger. Alright mother-father round two. I stumbled in the darkness still brooding with a silly sort of anxious madness and equipped myself with a modern bludgeoning weapon. A hammer.  What the fuck is up now huh??? I am smirking as I write this...

I swung at the fridge with the might of Thor. A cathartic experience. I opened the freezer to reveal it's noisy guts. This must be the motor that has been causing me so much distress. Whack bam THWOK, a resilient foe the motor is. I struck at the motor wildly for a good five minutes before pieces of it began to fall off and suddenly it was quiet. I was left with a deafening silence that spoke to me softly; i am losing my fucking mind. Still, victory was mine and through imaginary battles of grandeur I had earned myself a nights sleep. Peace was mine until the next inevitable conjuration of a soul riddled with anxiety.

Now I sit here on a lively Saturday in old town Heidelberg. My  bare feet in half lotus position against the cold metal grated bench. Throngs of people walk by, conversing loudly, singing, and smoking. All this noise and yet there is peace and joy inside. Through meditation I had learned to let the sounds of my inner and outer world play. Through meditation I have found a center that is at the very least, resilient to the conditions that disturb my peace. I believe there is unconditional peace and love within, how lucky i am to have had the time to find it.

What a journey it has been.

Tuesday, January 1, 2013

Wishes


  • May all beings, who find discomfort and friction in meditation, through sincere effort, find equanimity and the light within.

  • May all beings, who suffer from illness, through unrelenting conviction, find healing for themselves.

  • May all beings, who suffer from mental illness, with love and courage, empower themselves to question and work with the mind.

  • May all beings, who suffer from mysterious illnesses, through unrelenting conviction, find the answers for themselves and for the benefit of all beings.

  • May all beings, searching for direction and meaning in life, find the time and opportunity to look within

  • May all beings, searching for love and happiness in life, find the time and opportunity to look within

  • May all beings, searching for the truth, find peace and harmony in their journey

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Surfboard meditation


I went surfing for the second time in my life yesterday. I never knew Taiwan had such wonderful surfing opportunities until now at age 26. It is no surprise though, I spent much of my life thinking I had already seen and done everything so I often closed myself off to new experiences. Sheer arrogance and a lack of will to live fully deprived me of much joy.

As I battled the waves in a hulk like manner I was consistently blown away by the sheer beauty of my surroundings. Tropical mountains and a wild but comforting blue ocean seascape, what more could I ask for? Well, lots more actually, the mind is really skilled at wanting things endlessly!!

Thanks to the teachings of my new friends, I was riding the waves; I had little elegance but at least it was offset with much vigor and intensity. It was about two hours into the surf that I began to settle into a 'surfboard meditation'. As I rode the waves and was pummeled by the waves I began to contemplate how much change had occurred with regards to how I experience this precious human life. Sure, change is the only constant, but it still amazes me how much I feel like a completely different person sometimes.

It seems strange for such things to surface at this time but during my surf, the deeper recesses of my consciousness were manifesting past struggles. Mental relics and processes of my hateful past were showing up. Why I am not so sure but I knew they were to be taken seriously and not shoved under the rug, even during a surfing session. I vividly relived the past in my brain while I battled the surf. Days full of judgement, narcissism, and arrogance were brought to my attention. Days full of playing the role of the angry victim, the shortsighted warrior, the apathetic sloth.

Meditation can sometimes be described as the practice of seeking truth in every moment. As each moment arises we look at ourselves and our situation with the eyes of truth. As each moment dissolves we confront ourselves with an intense honesty so that we may be free in each new arising moment. So what was the truth of that moment? Well I think it was time to fully admit that every rotten thing that has occurred to me was exactly what I needed at the time. Although I have been living without remorse or regret, it was time to admit on a deeper level that I was fully responsible for every facet of my life. It was time for me to recognize the power of each and everyone of us as a creator. The quality and essence of my being was anger and torpor so naturally the situations that I encountered were imbued with such qualities too.

Our existence is a two way street, almost everything that essentially aggregates into what we call a life works on a two way street. We all know this on some level. We have all heard the wisdom phrases such as 'you reap what you sow'. The problem is that we don't know these truths on any meaningful level so that they may be integrated into our daily lives. Unfortunately, myself included, we often only know these truths in a very meager way.

So how can we integrate the simple but profound truths into our existence so as to enrich and brighten it? My answer is meditation, the cultivation and upward processing of our internal faculties so that we can approach life without pre-judgement and preconceptions. Meditation sometimes is the act of inward observation while maintaining a state of allowing. The practice of observation without control, seeing without grasping. Pressing our ears to hear the world that we think we know so well with curiosity and tenacity. My friends, the mind, like the body, prefers the path of least resistance. Meditation brings out this tendency into light again and again so that we become happily willing to swim upstream.

I sunk my feet into the ocean and hung onto my surfboard with my head resting on its side. I closed my eyes and allowed my body and consciousness to rest in uncertainty and neutrality. While staying vividly awake inside, I allowed the thoughts to present themselves. The truth of the moment was that I needed to take further responsibility for my past so that I could be more awake in the present. A distant rumble approaches, a wild wave crashes onto me and drags me into the deep. I remain in meditation. I take full responsibility for my life. Another rumble approaches, I am hit again head on by a sizable wave. I remain in meditation. I take full responsibility for my past and resolve to be more aware of my being. Again and again, waves crash, I am moved physically but mentally I stay right here.

This was my surfboard meditation and I am grateful that I have the luxury to do such things. May you discover your own inward processes as well for your benefit and the benefit of those around you. Remember that the ultimate teacher is inside you waiting to be developed. Do not deny yourself this.

Thank you for reading. May all sentient beings be free.

Sunday, July 15, 2012

Meditation and Familiarity. Published at the Inspire Health Center newsletter located in Vancouver, BC.


Meditation and familiarity
By: Larry Li

Someone much wiser than I once said that meditation is running into reality, implying that there is space for discovery and of course, running. This line of thought is harmonious the idea that in meditation we are discovering ourselves and the world around us. Learning to see the world everyday as new and fresh is a part of meditation as is learning to see reality without impressing our own judgments onto them. Please allow me to omit discussions of concentration, mindfulness, and insight today as we explore the idea of meditation as the act of familiarity. Be aware that this article is intended to prime your attitudes towards meditation so that you can discover your own meditative states of mind.

The Sanskrit word for meditation is sometimes translated into familiarity or the practice of becoming familiar. What do we become familiar with in meditation? It seems almost ridiculous to say that we are not familiar with ourselves but that is exactly what I am contending here. We are not so familiar with ourselves. In meditation I had to admit to myself that I did not know much about myself. I was quite familiar with my likes and dislikes and I was skilled at pursuing pleasure and avoiding pain; beyond that however I had little more to say.
 In meditation we should seek to hold an intention for aspiration while allowing the mind to present itself in whatever manner in each present moment.  The keyword here is allow and the skill of learning to allow is one that can be difficult to cultivate. With time and consistency however it is achievable by every single one of us. Developing our ability to “allow” can bring about profound and much unexpected positive changes to your life.

 Furthermore, it is important to hold an open, neutral, and curious attitude to each mental phenomenon that arises. It is useful to maintain a sense of neutral witnessing in your meditation. Approach your own existence and consciousness with compassion. Often times we are extremely hard on ourselves in meditation and expect too much too quickly. Often there is an illusion within ourselves that we can control our minds, meditation can show you quickly that the key is learning to let go of this desire for control.  Paradoxically, it is in learning to skillfully release this control that we gain a sense of control and knowing on a deeper level. This is a common theme in meditation as the inner path often presents knowledge that upon first examination seem contradictory.   

With regards to the act of becoming familiar, I say that there is no bad meditation and there is no good meditation; there simply is. In meditation we practice just observing ourselves and nothing more. It is important to equip yourself with a deep sense of humility as you approach your own existence with a blank slate. By doing this we will slowly become familiar with our tendencies to judge ourselves. We will become familiar with how we instantly react to steer the mind to a “good” place. In meditation we seek to see more than just the light, we seek to learn how to illuminate the darkness. Step by step we become more familiar and step by step our awareness expands. Concentration and insight is built from within and we begin to develop the capacity to truly internalize and integrate with the truths that we recognize to be so. Meditation will change your life at the very core of your existence and there is no one but you to do it. Best wishes to you my friend and good luck.

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Meditation translated as the practice of familiarity. I need your help!


Hello my dear readers. I recently wrote an article for a health centre here in Vancouver speaking about meditation and how is can be seen as a practice of familiarity. They have asked me to do a revision of the article and I could really use some feedback from anyone and everyone. They gave me two main points to focus on.

1. streamline the message with more of a focus on one singletheme
2. simplify the language – write about it like you would choose to talk about it – with passion, yet simplicity.

If you could read the article and tell me what you think I would greatly appreciate any feedback whether positive or negative.

Thanks in advance.

Below is the article:



Meditation and familiarity


In my experience, meditation is a broad term that is difficult to communicate effectively. The word meditation triggers a variety of thoughts influenced by culture, region, and religion. Some people will think visualization or inner peace or long sounds of OM. Others will think of meditation as a state with no thoughts or a state of pure love and compassion. As a young seeker I struggled when I heard instructions along the lines of “fill yourself with love and compassion.” Upon hearing this I would immediately fire back with the question of how? And are you kidding me? How do I fill myself with something that I am unfamiliar with? Something that I only have a limited awareness of? The answer was neutral observation of the self but it would take me years to fully understand that answer.

Someone much wiser than I once said that meditation is running into reality, implying that there is space for discovery and of course, running. This line of thought is harmonious the idea that in meditation we are discovering ourselves and the world around us. Learning to see the world for what it is without precepts and judgments tacked on by fragments of the whole truth. Please allow me to omit discussions of concentration, mindfulness, and insight today as we explore the idea of meditation as the act of familiarity.

The Sanskrit word for meditation is sometimes translated into familiarity or the practice of becoming familiar. What do we become familiar with in meditation? It seems almost ridiculous to say that we are not familiar with ourselves but that is exactly what I am contending here. We are not so familiar with ourselves. In meditation I had to admit to myself that I did not know much about myself. I was quite familiar with my likes and dislikes and I was skilled at pursuing pleasure and avoiding pain; beyond that however I had little more to say.

 In meditation we should seek to hold an intention for aspiration while allowing the mind to present itself in whatever manner in each present moment.  The keyword here is allow. Furthermore, it is important to hold an open, neutral, and curious attitude to each mental phenomenon that arises. It is useful to maintain a sense of neutral witnessing in your meditation. Arm yourself with the intellectual vigor of an inquisitive scientist and the compassion of a friend in meditation; there are no good and bad results, only results. Furthermore, in meditation we often have to work with truths that seem paradoxical and contradictory.  Does pain and pleasure arise from the same place? Find out for yourself!

With regards to the act of becoming familiar, I say once again that there is no bad meditation and there is no good meditation; there simply is. In meditation we practice just observing ourselves and nothing more. By doing this we will slowly become familiar with our tendencies to judge ourselves. We will become familiar with how we instantly react to steer the mind to a “good” place. In meditation we seek to see more than just the light, we seek to learn how to illuminate the darkness. Step by step we become more familiar and step by step our awareness expands. Concentration and insight is built from within and we begin to develop the capacity to truly internalize and integrate with the truths that we recognize to be so. Can you imagine how this will change your life and your experience of it?